Muscle Cars: A Brief History

Halden Zimmermann’s latest blog post

by Halden Zimmermann

Muscle cars are defined by a loud engine, a bulky tough frame and fast speeds. Many fans of muscle cars would rather a classic old muscle car than any new sports cars that have come out today.

Pontiac had been given the credit for making one of the very first muscle cars. This car was the 1964 GTO, a variation of the Tempest. This car had 389 cubic inches as well as a floor shifter as opposed to the standard shifter in the column of the car. It also housed a massive V-8 engine. Although this was one of the first, there were many different options  and styles for muscle cars once car makers realized how popular they were for the youth of that era.

1964 Pontiac GTO

1964 Pontiac GTO

Muscle cars were huge with the youth of that era because of the coolness and rebelliousness that the car made the buyers feel. Even though most manufacturers jumped on board and made their own muscle cars, people were unhappy to hear about the weights and prices of these muscle cars. This caused manufacturers to make cars known as “budget muscle cars.” These were produced in the mid 1970’s, with engines as big as 454’s. This engine was one of the largest ever made, which caused a slight increase in sales but safety was starting to become an issue with the common consumer.

Another major reason sales of muscle cars plummeted was due to the fact that insurance companies refused to insure them because of how powerful and unsafe they were. This and many other things led to the extinction of these massive beasts of cars.
Although muscle cars are not being made anymore. People pay top dollar to own these pieces of history and sport them around town for the guaranteed head-turn they’ll receive from most everyone on the street.

from Halden Zimmermann

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